Hannes Nel


  • Written by Dr. Hannes Nel, MBL; D. Com; D. Phil

     

    Post-modernism gradually became popular from the 1950s onwards. Instead of relying on one approach to knowing, post-modernists support a pluralistic […]

  • Oops, one set “is”. Can’t find an edit facility.

  • Hello Sylvia, Redress, in my opinion, is not only a good example of what can result from post-colonial research but also a good example of the difference between colonialism and post-colonialism. Colonialism as a paradigmatic approach to research often, though not always, was used by colonialist researchers. Consequently, it often was an effort to…[Read more]

  • Written by Dr. Hannes Nel, MBL; D. Com; D. Phil

    Post-colonialism is the study of the impact of colonial rule on colonised people and how it impacted on their culture, economy, religion, government, etc. The key […]

    • Thank you Hannes.
      Interesting – our Constitution speaks of redress – which I think is generally seen as redress for apartheid exclusion – but in addition to the legacy of apartheid, there is also an intertwining of colonialism influences. Something that is evident in a number of skills development related issues.

      • Hello Sylvia, Redress, in my opinion, is not only a good example of what can result from post-colonial research but also a good example of the difference between colonialism and post-colonialism. Colonialism as a paradigmatic approach to research often, though not always, was used by colonialist researchers. Consequently, it often was an effort to justify colonialism. Such researchers also tended to adopt a rather superior attitude towards the indigenous people of the colonies, and they followed an etic approach. Post-colonialism, as you rightly wrote, is often aimed at redress of historical injustices, written by citizens of countries that used to be colonies (sometimes also “outsiders” with integrity and a healthy sense of justice and fairness). Researches making use of post-colonialism mostly follow an emic approach.

    • Hannes, thank you. On your comments on race.

      For me, there are two parts to it:
      It is a social construct with no scientific founding – and so constructing research on variations of skin colour is problematic. BUT it has become real – so whether we look at the apartheid classifications (also no scientific founding), or watch CNN media reports of citizens of different skin colour, and how they talk of skin colour.

      Then the issue of superiority – globally, it seems to be growing worse rather than better: whether based upon the highly suspect classification of race, or gender – variations of which are also problematic, and variations of religious belief …..

      On your last sentence – I take the word respect.

      I have on my To Do list to start a discussion. I was asked to comment on the NSDP 2030 – one of the comments I included was the need for respect by the parties – SETAs, private providers, public providers. We cannot work together successfully unless we appreciate the challenges of each party and agree to respect each party.

  • Written by Dr. Hannes Nel, MBL; D. Com; D. Phil

    According to the positivist paradigm, true knowledge is based on experience of the senses and can be obtained by observation, and by conducting experiments, […]

  • Ah, Sylvia, You should have stayed with Grounded Theory. As you know, all academic research needs to be objective, but no research method is more open-minded than grounded theory. In grounded theory the researcher must allow the data that she or he collects to dictate the direction in which the research develops. The researcher depends and trusts…[Read more]

  • Hello Sylvia, In my book on qualitative research I differentiate between Ethnomethodology and Ethnography.
    Ethnomethodology is a paradigm that deals with social issues, specifically things that we can observe in everyday life.
    Ethnography, in my opinion, is a research method. One can argue that ethnomethodology is the philosophy behind ethnic…[Read more]

  • Written by Dr. Hannes Nel, MBL; D. Com; D. Phil

     Phenomenology is a philosophy that believes that individual behaviour is the product of a person’s experience through direct interaction with phenomena. An ob […]

    • Good day Hannes,
      Thank you so much for this new article. Reading through it, I found myself wondering about the differences and overlap of Phenomenology with Ethnographic approaches.
      Also what is the status of the researcher – e.g. not value-free?

      • Hello Sylvia, In my book on qualitative research I differentiate between Ethnomethodology and Ethnography.
        Ethnomethodology is a paradigm that deals with social issues, specifically things that we can observe in everyday life.
        Ethnography, in my opinion, is a research method. One can argue that ethnomethodology is the philosophy behind ethnic (actually “social” would be more accurate) research while ethnography is the method by which such research is conducted.
        I would appreciate your opinion on this. Also, could you please explain what you mean by the researcher being not “value-free”?
        Kind regards, Hannes

        • Thanks Hannes,
          Yes, I agree with your explanation – I should have compared with Ethnomethodology.
          On “value free”, I am referring to the position of the researcher – whether the researcher is considered entirely independent, such as in a positivist paradigm or a recognition of the subjective nature of the researcher contribution. The values and position of the researcher influence the identification of evidence and the interpretation of that evidence. I recall this being also being a debate between Weber and Marx.

          • Ah, Sylvia, You should have stayed with Grounded Theory. As you know, all academic research needs to be objective, but no research method is more open-minded than grounded theory. In grounded theory the researcher must allow the data that she or he collects to dictate the direction in which the research develops. The researcher depends and trusts the data and his or her findings and conclusions from the data entirely. I used it and it is a wonderful experience. The positivist paradigm supports grounded theory very well, even though it is mostly used with quantitative research. I think my last article explains this in enough detail? In closing, I find the angle at which you approach research methodology interesting and rather challenging. Love it.

            • Thanks Hannes – Yes I have Cathy Charmaz on my bookshelf – maybe for future.
              But I am currently persuaded that for the South African context we can benefit from the relevance of cultural-historical activity theory CHAT.
              Look forward to your next post. Thanks

  • Written by Dr. Hannes Nel, MBL; D. Com; D. Phil

    Neoliberalism is a description of the dominant mode of conducting political and economic organisation in a global world, which obviously would also be the field […]

  • Written by Dr. Hannes Nel, MBL; D. Com; D. Phil

     Modernism evolved over a period of approximately 400 years from a philosophy based on the interpretation of the mythical to a paradigm based on logic. Generally […]

  • Hello Sylvia, Thank you for being interested in my postings. The difference between an emic and etic approach lies in the way in which the researcher approaches his or her target group for the research. An emic approach would be if the researcher investigates her or his target group “from the inside”. This would mean that the researcher is inc…[Read more]

  • Written by Dr Hannes Nel, MBL; D. Com; D. Phil

    In our current day and age neoliberalism largely rendered liberalism obsolete. Even so, liberalism is still a relevant paradigm.

    Liberalism advocates tolerance, […]

    • Thank you Hannes. I read with interest, and I have a question and a request please.
      I see your comment about constructivism as variant of liberalism. I had not seen that. Is that a generally accepted view?
      Then a request please. Your last paragraph I think, leads into a discussion of a post-colonial epistemology. Could you engage with that please?

    • Thank you so much for your explanation. That becomes much clearer for me.
      I am interested in your distinction of academics representing an etic or emic approach in post-colonial studies.
      So following that distinction & taking it further – would it be correct in studying the apartheid years to be able to distinguish older students with a emic approach and young students with an etic approach?

      • Hello Sylvia, Thank you for being interested in my postings. The difference between an emic and etic approach lies in the way in which the researcher approaches his or her target group for the research. An emic approach would be if the researcher investigates her or his target group “from the inside”. This would mean that the researcher is included in the target for the research. An etic approach would be if the researcher is not included in the research target and do the research “from the outside”.
        If I were to do research on, say, the eating habits of people in Australia, I would need to follow an etic approach because I do not live in Australia. I would conduct the research “from the outside” and I would write a report on “them”. If I were to do the same research on people living in South Africa, it can include me because I live in South Africa, and I would then write a report on “us”. That would be an emic approach.

  • Written by Dr. Hannes Nel, MBL; D. Com; D. Phil

    Often also called ‘anti-positivism’ or ‘naturalistic inquiry’, interpretivism is a softer and more subjective way than hermeneutics in which to interpret data. W […]

  • Written by Dr. Hannes Nel

    I came across this interesting question in an article written by Samuel BA Isaacs, previous CEO of SAQA, and published in the SAQA Bulletin Volume 12, Number 2 of February 2012. The […]

  • Written by Dr Hannes Nel, MBL; D. Com; D. Phil  

     Hermeneutics deals with interpretation. Originally, hermeneutics referred to the study of the interpretation of written biblical text, but now it includes the i […]

  • Thank you, Sylvia, I noticed your and Lynel’s replies this morning already, but it was a busy day, so I did not read her comprehensive one in full yet. I will reply to her as well. Our challenges are not with the policies and procedures, or even legislation, but rather with what is discussed and said at informal forums and the workplace and how…[Read more]

  • Written by Dr Hannes Nel, MBL; D. Com; D. Phil

    Biological organisms have systems that perform various specialist and survival functions; similarly, social institutions “function” in a systematic and coh […]

  • Thank you once again, Sylvia. You are a remarkably able and professional person.

  • Sjee, Lynel, you really can move. Thank you for the voluminous reply which I have not read in full yet. I will probably respond again tomorrow if necessary. I appreciate your great effort to clarify things. Anyway, I don’t think we (us, not you) should complain too much – it serves no purpose.

  • Written by Dr. Hannes Nel, MBL; D. Com; D. Phil

     

    Feminism is grounded in feminist values and beliefs. Philosophically speaking feminism is the movement for the political, social, and educational equality […]

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