RPL, the NQF, and Articulation


Purpose of the NQF

Viewing 5 posts - 11 through 15 (of 39 total)
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  • #7318
    Joe Samuels
    Participant

    I want to thank Wilma for raising this issue and providing me with the opportunity to respond. The South African context lest who forget: 17 years ago we had 17 different departments of education, training was a completely separate entity. Qualifications were controlled by a huge number of racially different institutions. We now have one qualifications framework comprising 10 levels. We have three quality councils responsible for three sub-framework where all the qualifications are organised on one single framework. Much work needs to be done after 17 years, but to suggest that nothing has been done is a bit unfair. There is a host of research that is available on qualifications frameworks. Currently there are 130 qualifications frameworks operational in the world. One key development is the European Qualifications Framework (EQF) where 38 countries are developing their own qualifications frameworks referenced to the EQF. It is designed to help with the mobility of workers across the european continent.  All of the development are documented in research papers, websites and the like.

    The issue of NQF levels is currently being addressed. In November 2011 SAQA and the Quailty Councils agreed on 10 levels and level descriptors. SAQA will  do roadshows during February/March 2012 and a host of other educational processes to explain both the levels and the descriptors and how it should be corrently used and interpreted.  

    #7317

    Good post Wilma followed by some thought provoking comments, particularly the one posted by Neil Harrison

    Its been my experience that the majority of business people I speak to, find the NQF confusing, labour intensive and generally not value adding. 

    I facilitate on some learnerships and almost without exception,  am faced by learners who struggle to make the leap from theory to practical application in the workplace. The key reason for this an almost complete absence of support, coaching and / or feedback from line managers. Without this, the learners are unable to translate their learning into value for the business. Portfolio’s of Evidence are often completed with little learning and less enthusiasm.

    Whilst it is fair to say that some inroads have been made, I do support Wilma’s view that research on the impact of the NQF is insufficient and yet, South Africa as a nation continues to place all faith in it delivering what is required to help address some of the huge challenges in the country. Perhaps its time to do some research in South Africa to establish a meaningful way forward.

    It does seem to me that the spirit of intention at inception seems to have become somewhat buried in red tape, jargon and beaurocracy.

    #7316
    Skills Universe
    Keymaster

    Thank you for raising this pivotal point in the training and education system. My opinion is that as long as the universities do not buy into the NQF here in South Africa, the system is just not working. How is it possible that a student can pass, just for example, the subject of Accounting II at UNISA, but when trying to register at Tuks for the third year of his B.Com studies, Tuks does not recognize this subject succesfully passed at UNISA and won’t allow the student to enroll for Accounting III. In other words, there is no common “unit standard” for degree subjects for universities throughout the RSA. Yet when it comes to training for workplace skills programmes, the private training provider must adhere to registered unit standards on the NQF. So let SAQA expalin this double standards and how is it working in the benchmark countries that RSA so quickly use to explain where we are coming from.          

    #19558
    Skills Universe
    Keymaster

    Thank you for raising this pivotal point in the training and education system. My opinion is that as long as the universities do not buy into the NQF here in South Africa, the system is just not working. How is it possible that a student can pass, just for example, the subject of Accounting II at UNISA, but when trying to register at Tuks for the third year of his B.Com studies, Tuks does not recognize this subject succesfully passed at UNISA and won’t allow the student to enroll for Accounting III. In other words, there is no common “unit standard” for degree subjects for universities throughout the RSA. Yet when it comes to training for workplace skills programmes, the private training provider must adhere to registered unit standards on the NQF. So let SAQA expalin this double standards and how is it working in the benchmark countries that RSA so quickly use to explain where we are coming from.          

    #38112
    Skills Universe
    Keymaster

    Thank you for raising this pivotal point in the training and education system. My opinion is that as long as the universities do not buy into the NQF here in South Africa, the system is just not working. How is it possible that a student can pass, just for example, the subject of Accounting II at UNISA, but when trying to register at Tuks for the third year of his B.Com studies, Tuks does not recognize this subject succesfully passed at UNISA and won’t allow the student to enroll for Accounting III. In other words, there is no common “unit standard” for degree subjects for universities throughout the RSA. Yet when it comes to training for workplace skills programmes, the private training provider must adhere to registered unit standards on the NQF. So let SAQA expalin this double standards and how is it working in the benchmark countries that RSA so quickly use to explain where we are coming from.          

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