Concerned Learning Material Developers


Quality Control and Price Setting

This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Tass Schwab 3 weeks, 4 days ago.

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  • #70932

    Tass Schwab
    Participant

    I would like to pose two questions to this group, and gain some insight and feedback. I have been developing learning material since 2005 and also acting as an Agent for those whose material I feel is Quality and has no come backs.

    In the time I have been in this arena of Instructional Design, I have seen the Quality of the material drop, as well as the prices. I suspect it is linked, but I could also be wrong.

    Now, with the QCTO, there is no Quality check as there was with the SETA’s who gave feedback BEFORE the Learners experienced this. How can we ensure that our learners are getting Quality Learning? The QCTO says that the proof will come out in the Assessments, by then I feel it is too late.

    My questions thus are:
    1. How can we ensure that material is being produced that is Quality?
    2.How do you feel about price regulation? (currently there is QCTO material going for very low prices, knowing what is costs to employ Subject Matter experts to Author this work I question how this is possible)

    Your insights and ideas would be valued!!!

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  • #70933

    Kevin Nkomo
    Participant

    Afternoon Tass,

    The truth here is that most f the material that is going around being sold has not been developed by the sellers. I have sourced a lot of SETA and QCTO qualifications for clients and collected samples from sellers and noticed that its the same material thats being sold by different sellers. The price differences are shocking e.g. You can be quoted R25 000 for a QCTO qualification by one seller then the next quotes you R6 000 (R10 000 if you purchase 2) of the exact same material. Thats what is happening. Material got into hands of “retailers” who are now focusing on reselling…Im not too sure about their after-service.

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  • #70934

    Tass Schwab
    Participant

    Yes, I have also seen this. Where there is direct violation of SLA’s that state that the material may not be resold. I too have received samples from a few people who sell and its the same!! According to me a QCTO Qualification should cost at least R25 000 to cover development costs and remediation if needed.

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  • #70936

    Renate Steyn
    Participant

    Hi Tass
    Thanks for sharing. As a Training Provider, I really feel very strongly about the content and quality of the material that we purchase. I also like the assurance that it is tailor-made for our company. The Company that I use to purchase the material from has a very good system in place so that the content can not be changed or copied. This comes at a higher price which I gladly pay. The author is a subject matter expert and gave me his credentials. Maybe it is something to consider.

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  • #70938

    Lynel Farrell
    Participant

    Interesting subject, and valid concerns. Learning material has been developed by professional learning material developers for almost 2 decades, and so have sub-standard cheap learning material sold by shenanigans, which has been submitted for approval to SETAs (all of them). Now, what happens in our real world, is that a bright spark, would purchase learning material at lets say R25k, then remove some of the properties, and re-sell it at a lesser cost. If this bright spark sells the same learning material at R8k to 20 providers, then he covered the initial R25K and made a profit of R135k just on this one qualification – clever hey?

    The downfall of this cheap learning material, is that this bright spark will sell the same material for years, he/she already made their profit, so they reduce the price even more, and yes, the initial 20 providers, become 50 providers, and so the story line continuous.

    This material is outdated, sub-standard and clearly will have an effect on the learner. Poor learning material, will result in poor achievements.

    Now, if we look at the SETAs, not one of them have a policy in place for purchased learning material and copyright of learning material, right? Nor does SAQA, right? The question here is: why? The answer, well how many legal investigators would it take to handle this? Rather put the accountability and responsibility back in the provider’s lap. If your learning material is stolen, then you have the right to report it to SAPS, and take legal action.

    The QCTO is actually very clear, with the learning material. The QCTO gives you 3 documents (free to download, at no cost) per occupational qualification. The curriculum have been developed by subject matter experts and industry (perhaps we are not always happy with how it is compiled, but at least you are given the documents as a guideline). Yes, you need to complete a learning material matrix, this gives the QCTO information, that you have gone through the curriculum document, and you have ensured that all components and topics have been covered. If the provider makes up the matrix, then I hope the provider sleeps well at night, as it will bite you back double.

    Now, once the provider is accredited to run the occupational qualification, learner enrolments and achievements will be uploaded onto the QCTO system. Little does providers know (or perhaps did not listen carefully on all the roadshows), that the system red flags the provider, if the achievements against the enrolments are bad. What happens then? Well the provider will get a surprise visit, and a full monitoring visit will be done, which includes all the learning material as well. Remember, the provider indicated that all components have been met against the published curriculum document. And this is where de-registration of a provider will happen.

    It is all about the learner. If the learner is given quality learning material, that covers all the components against the occupational qualification, and prepared according to the assessment tasks and activities, the learner will be able to achieve the EISA. Quality Learning Material is key!

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  • #70954

    Tass Schwab
    Participant

    Hi Lynel, as always you are an absolute Gem, the following I want to highlight and put in bold again:

    “Little do providers know (or perhaps did not listen carefully on all the roadshows), that the system red flags the provider, if the achievements against the enrolments are bad. What happens then? Well the provider will get a surprise visit, and a full monitoring visit will be done, which includes all the learning material as well. Remember, the provider indicated that all components have been met against the published curriculum document. And this is where de-registration of a provider will happen.”

    I am feeling really moedeloos at the moment because of the HUGE loss of revenue because of the Cheapies being sold that have possibly been procured and resold despite the SLA binding no reselling.

    As Providers, you have the responsibility that your Learners are getting the best, its their lives you hold in your hands! I ask those who are selling material that should not be resold, do you sleep at night? I ask those that are churning our sub standard material, can you see the bigger picture of you not building the country?

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