HR & Personnel Practitioners


Which South African leader would be best for Human Resource practitioners?

This topic contains 1 reply, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Tebogo Boroto 2 years ago.

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  • #36971

    sylvia hammond
    Keymaster

    The UK Personnel Management online publication is currently running a survey asking American HR practitioners who would be best for HR – Obama or Romney.  But there is a much more important question for skills-universe members and South African human resource practitioners to consider:

    – which South African leader would be the most supportive for human resource practitioners and which would do the most for human resource development? 

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  • #36980

    Ian Webster
    Participant

    Now that’s a tough one, Sylvia. Brave of you. I worry that everyone is too busy taking everything they can out of the economy. No one is really interested in job creation.

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  • #36979

    sylvia hammond
    Keymaster

    Thanks Ian, I am hoping that this discussion could bring out items like job creation.  There are two sides to the question: what is HR and what is good for HR? and who supports that HR agenda?  On job creation, do you think that HR practitioners support job creation – or even see it as part of their agenda?

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  • #36978

    Probably Trevor Manuel. He seems to be the only leader who seems to understand the need to nurture and train staff

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  • #36977

    Ian Webster
    Participant

    Good question. No, probably not. If we are focused on anything (which we are not always) it is on getting the job done as efficiently as possible, not how to grow jobs. But that’s a reality to be taken into account by government. How do you incentivise job creation if the focus is on efficiency? 

    Well, growing the economy is one way (but not so as to syphon the growth into a limited number of pockets). 

    Overhauling the SETA system is also critical.  I think that the Pivotal grant may be key, but we have taken ten years and millions (billions?) of levy Rands to work out where to focus our energy in this regard, and we are still dithering.

    Health and education are also critical, but I fear that we spend too much time and energy, and waste millions of Rands, on working out new strategies and policies (OBE in, OBE out…), when implementation is the one thing we need and do not get right. Perhaps that is the missing ingredient in the whole system: middle managers who are competent and who are given freedom to get things done.  Skills shortage?  That is the critcal one.

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  • #36976

    Hannes Nel
    Participant

    I agree with David Screen. However, on his own Trevor Manual will achieve nothing. What he needs is a government that supports him and provides him with the resources needed to make a difference. Most importantly, we need a government who really cares about the community, not just their votes. JPN

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  • #36975

    Des Squire
    Participant

    In today’s world and particularly in South Africa the HR manager would need to see himself/herself as a strategic partner. In this role, the HR person would need  to contributes to the development of and the achievement of the  Governments HR plan and objectives – if such exist.

    The HR objectives should have been established to support the attainment of the overall strategic HR plan aligned to the needs of the people.

    This would require a partnership that impacs on HR in so many areas previously overlooked. Services such as housing, job creation, education of specific communicties, community development and infrastructure etc., would need to be addressed. 

    We would need to identify a person, the HR practitioner and professional who can aligned his or her thinking with both the community and individual needs of the people, a person who is capable of becoming a strategic contributor in terms of the issues previoously mentioned. 

    The HR Practitioner for South Africa would have to think like a business person, have a knowledge of finance and accounting, and be accountable and responsible for all related HR costs as well as the measurement of all previously mentioned HR programs and processes. So yes, perhaps Trevor Manual or Gill Marcus.  

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  • #36974

    sylvia hammond
    Keymaster

    Hi Des, Now that is interesting – on your comment “previously overlooked” – during apartheid years for the multinationals who stayed and were EEC or Sullivan signatories, things like housing and community development were part of HR.

    And on your and Hannes’ comment on Trevor Manual & Gill Marcus – surely that implies that HR practitioners need to be far more strategic and financially literate than previously?

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  • #36973

    Des Squire
    Participant

    Come on girl – all politicians need to be but in this role particularly so. Very few are unfortunately!!! 

    We have lost sight of the needs of our workers(our people) and business goals and (shareholder) profits have taken over. We need to bring back the human element ???? 

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  • #36972

    Tebogo Boroto
    Participant

    Hi all

    For Trevor to succeed, he will need to rope in someone like his wife. She has been around in the business circles and she is a no nonsense lady. Plans and objectives should be implemented because they may look kosher on paper until they get shifted from desk to desk.

    We must remember that the national skills development strategy in part of the NHRD. The question is how far are we as a nation with that strategy?

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