What is acceptable practice for non-accredited providers and the use of registered practitioners?


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This topic contains 27 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  Kate Sani 1 year, 11 months ago.

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  • #26181

    sylvia hammond
    Keymaster

    Two discussions were posted covering pretty much the same topic. Rather than duplicate the discussions, I’ve copied and pasted them into one single discussion for knowlegeable and experienced practitioners to comment.

    From Jaco Burger:

    Training as Un-registered or NY Registered

    Good day

    I would like to pick up a topic I found in the discussions on the year 2013: Can anyone Train?

    Would it be acceptable for registered Assessors and Facilitators to provide training on Short Courses in a unregistered Training Provider?

    What I gained from reading through those discussions was the following:

     – Do not advertise as a registered provider

     – Do not claim to have accredited courses (aligned with SAQA)

     – It is not illegal unless you are misleading the buyer into thinking they will obtain credits for the course

     – cannot use accredited course material

    If a company wants to expand into training, will it be acceptable to start with Skills Transferable courses? I am all for following proper guidelines, but is it not true that you need to start somewhere?

    So the response I am looking for is not to condole it or to train unregistered, I just need to know if it is legal to provide training on skills in the workplace without being a registered provider? Is there any infringements or legal acts such an entity should be aware of?

     

    From Nduduzo Makhanya

    CAN NON-ACCREDITED COMPANIES USE ACCREDITED FREELANCERS?

    Hi Colleagues

    If an invitation to bid stipulates that training has to be formerly assessed and NQF Aligned, does it mean that the bidding company has to be SETA accredited?

    Can the service provider not employ the services of an accredited assessor?

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  • #26206

    Frank Smit
    Participant

    Hi, we are not a registered training company as our background is e-learning development not training, however we are starting to provide more and more online and blended short business-related courses, developed with SME’s who currently provide training face to face. Most of these partners are not registered with a SETA either. None of this training is accredited with a SETA, although some is accredited with a university. We think this is OK and are not aware of any rule or law requiring us to be registered in order to provide this training service. We make no claim to it being accredited.

    On the other hand we have heard of registered providers offering parts of accredited qualifications as short 1 day courses with no credits… ie it is based on the accredited course but only an attendance certificate is issued. Is that OK?

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  • #26205

    Hi All

    As far as I know, there is nothing wrong with constituently registered assessors / moderators working for non-accredited training providers. I am also not sure that facilitators can / should be “registered”.

    Anybody / organisation can offer non-accredited training services in whichever way they want. The thing is that they cannot claim to offer SETA credits / Certificates of Competence. 

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  • #26204

    Jacobus Burger
    Participant

    Thanks Frank

    My question was for a company in some what the same boat. They want to start training computer skills wise to their clients. Thus it will be site specific training on the client’s business line applications.

    But they want to expand to basic PC Skills too. Thanks for the input.

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  • #26203

    Marlie Spencer
    Participant

    Hi all,

    – Providers / individuals may offer non-accredited training, as long as they are clear about the status of the applicable course.  The majority of providers / individuals start off by offering non-accredited programmes.

    – If a bid document requires the bidder to be accredited, then the bidding company MUST be accredited for the relevant qualification / unit standard / skills programme as required by the terms of reference.  An unaccredited bidder may enter into a JV with an accredited training provider, if the terms of reference allow for it.

    – A registered assessor / moderator is NOT accredited.  It simply means that the individual may conduct assessment or moderation on behalf of an accredited training provider.

    – A provider accredited for a full qualification cannot automatically assume that it may deliver and assess on the associated unit standards included in the full qualification.  The provider needs to confirm this with the relevant Quality Assurance Partner (QAP) under the QCTO, which could be a SETA / professional body / other entity.

    – There is a big difference between accreditation and registration, and the two terms should not be used interchangeably.  Providers under the QCTO QAPs are currently not required to register with the Department of Higher Education and Training.  Assessors and moderators are also not accredited, but are registered by the relevant QCTO QAP.

    Hope this helps.

    Marlie

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  • #26202

    Jacobus Burger
    Participant

    Thanks, that pretty much answers one of my other questions regarding certificates. So, non-registered trainer can only issue a Course Completion Certificate?

    I assume that certifying competence against a qualification requires accreditation, which is self explanatory, but completing a course constructed by a company can only be validated by the same company?

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  • #26201

    Louis Nel
    Participant

    I would like to respond to the 1st two  posts.

    Jaco

    I am not advocating for unaccredited training, but anyone can indeed train as long as you do not claim to have accreditation and expect that a SETA will fund this training. If an organisation decides to make use of your services and are aware that you do not have accreditation there is nothing illegal about this. The BBBEE skills development score card makes provision for training other than accredited programmes as well (Programme matrix Categories F and G)

     Nduduzo

    If the company who tenders is not accredited and will be outsourcing the training to an accredited provider, this will have to be disclosed in the tender bid application. It is unlikely that the SETA will accept this as they could deal with the accredited provider directly. Most of the tender documents   indicate that the successful candidate will not be allowed to outsource accept if agreed upon as part of the SLA

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  • #26200

    Jacobus Burger
    Participant

    Thank you Marlie, makes sense.

    Sorry for my incorrect use of terminology. This is why I ask the professionals.

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  • #26199

    Jacobus Burger
    Participant

    Great thanks, so the current company in question can still use their BEE certificate in conjunction with unaccredited training as long as they disclaim it as such.

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  • #26198

    Louis Nel
    Participant

    The company who secures the services of the “unaccredited training provider”, can earn points for the unaccredited training. This is outlined under category F and G of the BBBEE categories. All it means is that this could in the end provide them with points towards their BBBEEE level (There is a cap on the % allowed for these training interventions).

    The actual costs of the programme can only be claimed under mandatory grants when the company submits their ART and WSP.(Again certain rules apply of how much can be claimed)

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  • #26197

    Jacobus Burger
    Participant

    Thanks, makes sense.

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  • #26196

    Nduduzo Makhanya
    Participant

    Thanks Marlie

    Please excuse my ignorance on this subject Marlie

    Let me perhaps quote exactly what the document says “Training for the afore-mentioned should have a formal assessment and be NQF aligned”. Can we safely say that this sentence means that the service provider has to be accredited? I know that the best course of action is to get clarity from the department concerned but I cannot get hold of their contact person.

    Thanks

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  • #26195

    Nduduzo Makhanya
    Participant

    Thank you all for your eye opening replies. Like, Jaco my intention is also to get information so that I can follow proper practices.

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  • #26194

    Frank Smit
    Participant

    HI Jaco

    I believe there is nothing against a non-registered trainer issuing certificates of competence (not only completion or attendance) in terms of the assessments linked to the course. This is obviously not a certificate of competence in terms of an accredited course.

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  • #26193

    Nduduzo Makhanya
    Participant

    Hi Fraink please drop me an email nw.makhanya@gmail.com. I would like to discuss business.

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  • #26192

    Jacobus Burger
    Participant

    Great, thanks.

    As long as the evidence compiled throughout the course agrees with the judgement I suppose. Great to hear it from the guys in the business world. Thank you.

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  • #26191

    Marlie Spencer
    Participant

    Hi Nduduzo,

    The sentence is ambiguous so it may be best to obtain an answer from them directly.  I can however not think that they would want a formal assessment that is NQF-aligned, which is not accredited.  Perhaps also check the evaluation criteria, and the required supporting evidence to be included.

    All the best in the submission!

    Marlie

       

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  • #26190

    Nduduzo Makhanya
    Participant

    Thank you Marlie

    Well, I have spoken to them and they are not quite sure. They say it’s preferable for accountability. As far as supporting documentation is concerned, nothing specifies accreditation. So my other question still stands. In your view Marlie, is it wrong for a non-accredited service provider to employ the services of a registered Assessor (to ensure that training is formerly assessed as stipulated in the bid document)?

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  • #26189

    Ian Webster
    Participant

    Hi Louis,

    This is a misunderstanding that has been around for a while. You cannot claim any costs against your mandatory grant. It is a fixed percentage of your levy, irrespective of the amount or cost of training done. One enters the training in one’s Workplace Skills Plan and Annual Training Report. If the submission is accepted, you get your grant.

    I have to confess to being irritated by training providers who falsely claim that their training can be claimed from your mandatory grant. It is simply not true.

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  • #26188

    Maxine Peters
    Participant

    Marlie

    thanks for this eye opening information.  does this mean a training provider has a choice of registering with a relevant SETA or registering with QCTO QAP?

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  • #26187

    Ian Webster
    Participant

    As my colleagues have said, there is no requirement to be registered.

    I am not registered or accredited, but, like many of you, no doubt, I ran the training of managers when I was in corporate using my own and proprietary material. Now, as a freelancer, I do the same thing for a wider audience.

    Of course, some only want registered providers offering accredited training, which is fine.

    Others come to me because they trust what I can offer their staff. (Either that, or they just want to get out of the office for a day, but I’ll stick to the earlier explanation!)

    Thanks for the interesting discussion

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  • #26186

    Marlie Spencer
    Participant

    Hi Maxine,

    All SETAs are QAPs of the QCTO, but not all QAPs are SETAs.  Some QAPs are professional bodies or industry associations.  These should not be confused with AQPs under the QCTO…

    QAPs relate to the ‘old’ unit standards- or outcomes-based SETA qualifications, and AQPs relate to the ‘new’ curriculum-based qualifications which result in a specific occupation. 

    To answer your question: no, there is no choice since the SETA in question is the QAP, performing accreditation on behalf of the QCTO.  

    Apologies if this is confusing.  Message me if you need more info.

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  • #26185

    Marlie Spencer
    Participant

    Hi, 

    There is nothing wrong with using a registered assessor, but the registration would not make any contribution in such a scenario.  Whether you use a registered assessor or not for the assessment process, the learners will not receive credit and will not be certificated.  If you want to make use of a registered assessor simply because they will add a level of professionalism to the process, please go ahead.  You should just make it very clear that the assessment will not result in credits and certification under the NQF, in an effort to manage expectations.  There are many cases where learners or clients assumed that training and assessment is accredited because of the involvement of a registered assessor, with the end result being complaints and appeals logged at various authorities.  Please protect yourself, as reputation is of utmost importance.

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  • #26184

    Nduduzo Makhanya
    Participant

    Crystal clear. Thank you Marlie

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  • #26183

    Maxine Peters
    Participant

    Good evening

    Thanks, Marlie not confusing at all. 

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  • #26182

    Marlie you are spot on. I would like to share two points:

    1. All training interventions in a company (public or private) should focus on improving the net profit or the realisation of the mission and strategic intent (objectives) of the company. These training interventions should thus be all competency based (performance driven) and return on Investment (ROI) MUST be measured to ensure that company received value. You don’t need to be a registered assessor or moderator or an accredited provider to conduct these kind of training/interventions. 

    2. We should move away from delivering stand alone unit standards and rather focuses on supporting people to achieve the overall qualification. How many people in the workplace attend training (in the form of a stand alone unit standard) and never attempt to achieve all the other unit standards related to the qualification?  Should the person want a stand alone unit standard(as a form of “recognition” ) I believe that a career discussion should be held to determine what qualification the person is pursuing – it is all about qualifications! Unit standards alone will probably open a few doors for you in career progressing BUT qualifications (consisting of unit standards) and accomplishments (consisting of competence enhancement efforts for the individual through focused organisational development options or training solutions to enhance company performance) will open more doors for a person. 

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  • #62546

    Sandile khumalo
    Participant

    What is the penalty for a non-accredited training provider misleading their clients, besides the detriment to their image?

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  • #62581

    Kate Sani
    Participant

    To protect oneself as a provider offering non-accredited training, it is wise to ensure delegates/learners sign a declaration confirming that they are aware that it is non-accredited.
    Secondly, that any “certificate” issued to the learner also clearly indicates that the training is non-accredited.

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