The Basics of Quality Management Policies (Accreditation)


Front Page Looking For… Verifiers / Evaluators of ETD Providers The Basics of Quality Management Policies (Accreditation)

This topic contains 13 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Lynel Farrell 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #36053

    Lynel Farrell
    Participant

    I might not be on my favorite site (Skills Universe) on a daily basis, but after catching up on some discussions, I would like to share the following with you. These are my views, and I stick with my beliefs (I am always open to criticism, and I believe in freedom of speech) however, when it comes to quality assurance and the management thereof, I get pedantic (this might not always be a good thing, maybe one of my weak points – I am working on it), so here goes:

    As per SAQA’s core criteria for providers, an accredited provider must:

    Define and describe the purpose of the organisation, including a description of the vision and the vision of the provider.

    Develop and document a quality management system (QMS), including policies and procedures for Programme delivery, staff, learners and assessment.

    Develop and document review mechanisms in terms of the implementation of policies and procedures.

    Maintain management systems, including financial and administrative resources and physical infrastructure of the provider.

    My views are as follows (taking in consideration the above);

    Using a basic Policy Framework to put your policies together:

    Always start with your Vision, Mission and your Core Values and then go on with the various policies addressing specific areas in your ETD environment.

    1. Start each policy with: Overview (policy purpose, legislation, related policies, scope (don’t forget to note your exclusions, if any) terminology, statement and appeals (if applicable)

    2. Then your Implementation (scope, process, guidelines ( how you will implement it and the flow of your processes should be easily understandable for any person reading your policies)

    3. Following by your Maintenance (this is your quality assurance by reviews) here you will state how this will be done, when it will be done, how often it will be done and the person responsible to ensure it IS done. Reviews are important, as this is how we ensure that our quality policies are working for us and that the quality we want to uphold at all times are implemented, followed through and non-conformance is avoided by all times. (You need to include non-conformance in your policies)

    4. Lastly include your References (this is with regards to your procedures and those of your other inputs taken from various other policies from SAQA, QCTO, your SETA or any other institution that needs to be mentioned, in order to acknowledge them)

    If you are thinking about accreditation for your ETD business, use the above to get some form of flow and standard. I would also suggest that you use the 7 Basic Policies (my view) which is:

    1. Education Training and Development (ETD) QMS Policy (monitoring, review)
    2. Learning Programme Policy (design, development, delivery,evaluation)
    3. Learning Programme (learnerships), Skills Programmes Policy
    4. Assessment and Moderation Policy (don’t forget to add your RPL, Appeals, plagiarism, Assessors, Moderators, Facilitators, code of conduct etc)
    5. Learner Policy (selection, guidance, support, special needs etc)
    6. Staff Policy. (Management of ETD practitioners, selection, development)
    7. ETD Administration Policy (Financial, administrative, record keeping, storage, reporting, physical structures, resources)

    Ensure you make it generic enough for your Business when the QCTO is in full swing that your policies would still speak QUALITY and you are able to integrate your policies with any new developments and policies that could be legislated in the coming future.

    I hope this helps those that is struggling to get some form of structure. I am no expert, but this is what I would look at. I like this structure. Your comments are highly appreciated.

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  • #36064

    Lynel Farrell
    Participant

    Any comments on these notes?  Agree or Disagree?  Should I post more on this topic? 

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  • #36063

    Lynel Farrell
    Participant

    What can I say, I tried!

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  • #36062

    Tass Schwab
    Participant

    Hi Lynel,

    Thank you for this insight. I wish I had seen this a couple of years ago, I might be wiser! Its really not my favourite arena of EDT…

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  • #36061

    Lynel Farrell
    Participant

    Hi Tass!
    Thank you for commenting, I really appreciate it. I have done so much research on what providers need in various industries and one of the biggest gripes or difficulties was the QMS policies and how to implement it. I was not sure if it would make any difference now, who knows, maybe it will help one person.

    If that is the case, my goal have been achieved!

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  • #36060

    I fully agree with all the stuff mentioned, however, the implementation is somehow not that easy at the beginning and too difficult for small providers without any support whatsoever.

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  • #36059

    Lynel Farrell
    Participant

     

    Hi Japhta, thank you for your comments.  Unfortunately, when looking at the implementation, people tend to write un-realistic guidelines which in the end becomes an administration nightmare.  Carefull consideration must be taken when writing the guidelines of implementation in an easily understandable sequence.  You must also remember, when processess, procedures, steps, guidelines are improved, this should be amended in the policies – again unfortunately once policies are written, no-one (hardly anyone) actually reviews them annually to ensure that they are current and meaningfull.  Policies are put in place to ensure that standards are met, on the otherhand, why will you have policies if they are not read nor reviewed.  This is so important!  Implementation will commence only when the planning was done correctly.

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  • #36058

    It seems to me that all sectors have ministrial support in all respect, but ours as private providers not even mentioned in any regard to see that this sector is taken cognisance thereoff. Someone told me that there is no any developmental plans for our sector and i begin to understand that. However, there is more confussion of what is expected from the bosses up there and what will it be to a small private provider out there. Hence we need this interactions and joing all relevant groups that at some point don’t duplicate but cement consensus in all aspect of our sectoral development. Thank you Lynel and lets remember those with no access to these wonderfull insightful information. Thanx 

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  • #36057

    Lynel Farrell
    Participant

    Hi Japhta
    It can be very frustrating, I understand. What private providers need to do, is work with their SETAs, build relationships with them, when needing assistance, ask for help. I don’t want to sound too positive, but I have learned that asking for assistance will take you far. Be patient, and stay positive. I wrote the above for newly providers and current providers, because I care! For the providers that would like to get more information, please feel free to ask questions. Where we can help, we will do our best to assist!

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  • #36056

    Jason le Grange
    Participant

    Don’t worry Quality Assurance is a way of life! I have been working with various SETA’s, Quality Councils and am always thankful when we have an opportunity to review the basics of quality assurance and remember that the basics help to improve the experience of the learner.

    I also urge people to reference the SAQA documents which are sadly not read or understood in context like:

    South African Qualifications Authority (2001) “Criteria and Guidelines for ETQAs”

     

    South African Qualifications Authority (2001) “Criteria and Guidelines for Providers”

     

    South African Qualifications Authority (2001) “Quality Management Systems for Education and Training Providers”

     

    South African Qualifications Authority (2001) “Criteria and Guidelines

    for Assessment of NQF Registered Unit standards and Qualifications”

    And for those wanting to implement RPL the national guidelines also available on the SAQA website.

    I am sadly in constant conflict with some Providers who see quality assurance as an unnecessary burden rather than as an opportunity to deliver a quality product.

    Thanks for the post and I hope others will reference this.

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  • #36055

    Lynel Farrell
    Participant

    Hi Jason! Thank you for your input! I completely agree with the list of guidelines from SAQA. If providers are conducting training with quality guidelines it wouldn’t be a burden. Guidelines are put in place to ensure that we don’t loose track of set standards, therefor the review mechanisms are so important! When taking policies, guidelines, criterias’, rules and regulations for granted, it eventually has a negative ripple effect that flows into the development of individuals, which we do not want. I learn something every day, and appreciate the quality aspects of quality learning. Knowledge is Power!

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  • #36054

    Lynel Farrell
    Participant

    Maybe some guidelines on the implementation should be looked at next?

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  • #69841

    Jacobus Burger
    Participant

    Thank you for this post, I was looking for a summarised informational by a professional. Reading forum after forum and long tedious documents after another sometimes just doesn’t colour the whole picture. And who to ask for advice or compare thoughts?

    Thanks Lynel

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    • #69842

      Lynel Farrell
      Participant

      Hi Jacobus, you are most welcome. I posted this discussion in 2013. A QMS should be a guideline that give processes and procedures in order to set a standard. Some providers pay for a QMS, print it, and keep it in a cupboard to collect dust, and others make use of it on a continuous basis, which it should be. If you base your QMS on the old SAQA 8 core criteria, and build on that, you will be fine!

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      • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by  Lynel Farrell.

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