Learnerships vs Apprenticeships


Front Page Looking For… SMME Micro, Small and Medium enterprises Learnerships vs Apprenticeships

This topic contains 10 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Skills Universe 2 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #39501

     

    I have had extensive discussions with private training providers and their stats show conclusively that in the construction industry, Apprenticeships are favoured far above Learnerships.

     

    I have the reasons for this state of affairs but I would like members to comment as to the reasons for this situation

     

    Selwyn Schrieff

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  • #39509

    My experience with 5-year apprenticeships in the Engineering and Electronics fields in the late 1960’s was that they were generally held in high regard by both employers and employees because of their well integrated structure, substance, and assessment processes. I believe the same applied in most other industries. One has the impression that Learnerships in general are a markedly superficial version with quantity far outstripping quality.

    One understands that, amongst others, there were political and social imperatives driving the introduction of Learnerships but I have never understood the need to have effectively abandoned the apprenticeship system even though the numbers were declining by the early 1990’s. Another case of them being viewed as an apartheid construct and chucking the baby out with the bath water perhaps?

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  • #39508

    Hi Brian, a very properous 2011 to you and yours.

     

    It is ironical, that from the information at my disposal, both Employers and Employees prefer the Apprenticeship route. The learnership method is too long winded and as stated, the maths requirements far exceed the need – Construction Industry – Artisan level and to boot the learner still has to complete 18 months practical after a four year theoretical stint.

     

    regards

     

    Selwyn

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  • #39507

    Hi Selwyn, thanks and the same to you.
    I am certainly not an authority on this but if my memory serves me, there were apprenticeships of different duration in the Construction Industry but the basic structure was the same. Typically block tech for three months each year (usually doing 4 subjects) and the rest on-the-job training and experience. At the end one had to have completed a certain number of N-Level exams and went to a designated center for a trade test. Quality used to vary somewhat on a practical level because obviously not all employers were the same and neither were the artisans to whom the Appies were attached. Of course, the other limitation was that until well into the 1980’s, most Appies were white. Probably part of the National Party’s job reservation programme. Notwithstanding, the system generally worked well in terms of skills transfer and capacity building. One hopes that the positive elements can be restored as a matter of urgency. Regards, Brian

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  • #39506

    Hi Brian

     

    I also am not too knowledgeable on the subject, but I do believe the apprenticeship program has more than one model – something about a person who has more than (I think) five years practical experience – almost like the old major apprenticeship

     

    I too hope that the SETA’s wake up and stop wasting both time and money and start offering meaningful training solutions. I also noticed that Blade Ndzimane took them to task recently

     

    Regards

     

    Selwyn

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  • #39505

    I know it always sounds so negative and pessimistic when one reflects on the SETA movement. Your hopes are something that has been echoed on a massive scale countrywide for the past 10 years. But for a few pockets of excellence, the movement as a whole has failed. Its the usual combination of incompetence and divergent agendas. I fear we will look back on history and judge this movement in terms of cost / benefit in the same envelope as outcomes-based education, teacher retrenchment and the transfer of nursing and teacher training to universities. Fundamentally flawed and incapable of focused and sustained delivery. But, we can live in hope!

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  • #39504

    AMEN

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  • #39503

    Skills Universe
    Keymaster

    Hi,

    What confuses me is that Learnerships was designed to have the same syllabus across the country, whether you are in Cape Town or JHB, but if you apply for accreditation with a Seta, they want your developed learnership material. In the apprenticeship of the 70’s and the 80’s the MEIETB supplied the material so that everybody has the same.

    SAQA says: All Qualifications and part qualifications registered on the NQF are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for a profit.

    I was told by a Seta if I want training material for one Qualification it will cost me +- R800,000, I laughed at him and asked him if that is why he is driving around with a S320 Merc. 

    Why do the Seta’s not supply the Learning material.

    Daniel

     

     

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  • #43353

    Skills Universe
    Keymaster

    Hi,

    What confuses me is that Learnerships was designed to have the same syllabus across the country, whether you are in Cape Town or JHB, but if you apply for accreditation with a Seta, they want your developed learnership material. In the apprenticeship of the 70’s and the 80’s the MEIETB supplied the material so that everybody has the same.

    SAQA says: All Qualifications and part qualifications registered on the NQF are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for a profit.

    I was told by a Seta if I want training material for one Qualification it will cost me +- R800,000, I laughed at him and asked him if that is why he is driving around with a S320 Merc. 

    Why do the Seta’s not supply the Learning material.

    Daniel

     

     

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  • #44393

    Skills Universe
    Keymaster

    Hi,

    What confuses me is that Learnerships was designed to have the same syllabus across the country, whether you are in Cape Town or JHB, but if you apply for accreditation with a Seta, they want your developed learnership material. In the apprenticeship of the 70’s and the 80’s the MEIETB supplied the material so that everybody has the same.

    SAQA says: All Qualifications and part qualifications registered on the NQF are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for a profit.

    I was told by a Seta if I want training material for one Qualification it will cost me +- R800,000, I laughed at him and asked him if that is why he is driving around with a S320 Merc. 

    Why do the Seta’s not supply the Learning material.

    Daniel

     

     

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  • #39502

    It gets worse than that. Some years ago we developed a comprehensive end-user computing package, exactly to unit standards and with many user-friendly features, for use by the Services Seta in a schools programme they were piloting. Being completely generic and very learner-centered, we subsequently offered it free-of-charge and with no strings attached to the Isett Seta. They didn’t even bother to respond! To this day they have never produced such a thing themselves. Makes you think doesn’t it?

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