LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT, THE INGREDIENT FOR A TRANSFORMED SOUTH AFRICA. 1


The politicians and the business (corporate) community will continue to blame one another for as long as they both show weaknesses in their Leadership capabilities. Politicians need to confine themselves to listening skills and to create an environment, through constructive well balanced legislation in transforming a very “sick” “LEADERSHIP” community.

The business (corporate sector) community on the other hand need to transform their selfish attitude by committing itself in supporting transformation of the South African business community into a “PEOPLE CENTRED”

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One thought on “LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT, THE INGREDIENT FOR A TRANSFORMED SOUTH AFRICA.

  • Brian Moores-Pitt

    Hi Moegsien,
    Can I respectfully suggest you read Anne Bernsteins: The Case for Business in Developing Economies. There is just so much misinformation and distortions bandied about in this country about our own and other business communities. So much so that until we change these perspectives – particularly in the minds of the youth (and the politicians for that matter), we simply cannot go forward. It seems most people in this country do not actually understand the role of either business or government in a market economy or its contribution to the society in which it operates. We have to change that – not with propoganda but with facts and examples. What we should really be doing is dropping half of the existing Business Studies syllabus in schools and tertiary institutions and replacing it with the substance of Bernstein’s and others work. That way people will learn to appreciate what most presently take for granted or don’t know about. It will also build an informed platform on which to launch a much more favourable business, leadership and entrepreneurial culture in South Africa – a precondition to sustainable economic growth and poverty reduction. Let us all add value to this process by getting a better understanding of how market economies around the world are actually working and how private enterprise is driving positive change – including in our own country despite entrenched negative perceptions and a less than ideal government contribution.